Séminaire Ecobio en lien avec l'ENS Rennes : Dixia Fan (Westlake Univ, Chine) et James Herbert-Read (Cambridge Univ, UK)

"Learning from Fish: A Peek into Future Marine Vehicles" et "Animal groups as mobile sensor networks"

Séminaire Ecobio en lien avec l'ENS Rennes : Dixia Fan (Westlake Univ, Chine) et James Herbert-Read (Cambridge Univ, UK)
Mercredi 3 mai 2023, 09h00
Observatoire des Sciences de l'Univers de Rennes (OSUR) - Campus de Beaulieu, Bâtiment 14B, Salle de conférence

1er séminaire: The subject of biomimetics looks for inspiration from biological systems to develop innovative, even revolutionary, engineering solutions. For marine science, biomimetics is particularly attractive, as evolution began in the oceans. Animals are found in various strange marine environments, from tropical coral reefs to biting polar ice waters. As a result, different aquatic animals have acquired fantastic survival skills, helping them to overcome various survival challenges. In this talk, I will learn from amazing sea creatures such as sea turtles, harbor seals, bluefin tuna, blind cavefish, puffins, octopuses, etc. I will discuss the history and current status of bio-inspired research for marine engineering and "peek" into the future of marine technology. 2e séminaire: Mobile sensor networks are a rapidly emerging technology with broad applications in environmental monitoring, surveillance and defense. But engineers designing mobile sensor networks face a significant challenge; how should mobile sensor networks be designed so that they can reliably detect information in noisy, dynamically changing environments, and at the same time be energy efficient? Moving animal groups such as flocks of birds or schools of fish function and face the same challenges as our own engineered sensor networks. In this talk, I will present ongoing work quantifying how animal groups self-organize to form mobile sensor networks that can reliably detect information in noisy and dynamically changing environments. Overall, the talk will provide insights into the ways animals adapt their behaviour to improve information gathering, which may ultimately inform the design of our own sensor network technology.